ACT – “A Christmas Carol” Pre-Show    

The following will be performed by Bessie Elementary 5th Graders

                                  December 5, 2019 at11 AM

       Before a matinee of ACT’s production of “A Christmas Carol”

                                                ___________________________________________________________________

Juan Manzo introduces Bessie Carmichael Elementary Singers.

Music vamps until Mr. Peter counts them in.

 

 

 

 

Mr. Peter:        1, 2, Ready, Go!

“At ACT”                               Words and music by Peter Sroka

Welcome to the theater,

the historic Geary Theater.

Welcome to the theater at A.C.T.

Sit back and relate

to the stories we create,

Let the stage become your gate at A.C.T.

The American Conservatory Theater

is the company that brought us here today,

to this 1910 one thousand forty seater.

It's the place where you are about to see "A Christmas Carol."

Welcome to the theater,

The historic Geary Theater.

Welcome to the theater at A.C.T.

The script is where we start,

then the process shapes the art.

Everybody plays a part at A.C.T.

​​

The American Conservatory Theater,

Imagination can become reality.

Words and sound and light trigger your feelings.

A kind of magic happens here that you will see in London.

​​

Welcome to the theater,

the historic Geary Theater!

Thank you for coming to A.C.T

Four students step forward to the microphones. 

Two of them are clapping excitedly, jumping up and down.

THALIA:       (Jumping up and down) I'm so excited!

OLIVER:       I know, look at that crowd!  Hey everyone!

                     (The audience responds)

                     Can you believe all these people came out to see us?

REMY:           They’re not here to see us, silly.  

 

ANGELINA:   They’re here to see “A Christmas Carol.”

JOSHUA:       Yeah, but we’re part of the show.

REMY:            We’re just the warm up act.

THALIA:          Who cares about that.  

                       I'm just so excited to go to London!

                       I’ve never even been on a plane before.

OLIVER:         (Turning to Student 3) Do you want to tell her?

ANGELINA:    No, it's okay, you can tell her.

OLIVER:         Awe come on please, you tell her.

THALIA:         Tell me what?

ANGELINA:    We’re not really going to London.

THALIA:           WHAT?  We’re not?  But in the song…

REMY​:              It’s make-believe.  It’s not the real London.

THALIA:            Make believe?

REMY:               You know, it's the setting, the place and time of the play we are

                         going to watch.

JOSHUA:          We will be transported to 19th Century London through the magic of theater.

THALIA:            (Very disappointed) Awe, now I’ll never get that plane ride.

JAELA:              Planes weren’t even invented back then.

 

BERNICE:         We wouldn’t really want to find ourselves in that time and place anyhow.

ANGELINE:      How come?

BERNICE:        There were no labor laws, let alone child labor laws. 

                         You might be forced to work 12 hours or more a day.

ANGELINE:       What?

AFREEN:           True.  Even Charles Dickens, the playwright, worked in a factory as a boy. 

                          At the time, his parents were in debtors’ prison.

BERNICE:          Some say “A Christmas Carol” was Dickens' response to a report

                           published in 1842 about child labor.

                           He was one of many people speaking out for the rights of workers.

ASHLEY:             Like Dolores.

HASSAN:            Who?

ASHLEY:             Dolores Huerta, you know, the woman who helped starte the UFW.

HASSAN:            What's that?

ASHLEY:             The UFW, The United Farm Workers.

                           She worked with Larry Itliong and Cesar Chavez.

KALIAH:             She received the Presidential Award of Freedom from Obama

                           for lending him his campaign slogan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song – Said Dolores

When shadows are cast on our spirit,

And they try to strike fear in our heart,

Remember the power within us all,

To light our own way from the start,

​            And pave a vision forward,

With the strength of collective will,

To meet the needs of our children,

By shining our light on Capitol Hill,

​            "Si se puede," said Dolores,

Long before Obama,

But her fortitude and independence,

Could be a credit to her mama,

​            Who owned a large hotel,

In the Central California Valley,

Where she sheltered farm workers,

When they were short on food and money,

​             Imagine the day when all children walk,

Without holes in their shoes,

Imagine the day the workers sing,

When songs of joy resolve the Blues,

​            Si se puede, si se puede,

Said Dolores, si se puede,

Long before Obama,

Yes we can!(repeat)

​            At home, church, and at school,

She was quick to volunteer,

A Girl Scout and a majorette,

To Dolores it was clear,

            Change can only come,

When we look to our own hand,

And claim the value,

That we bring to this land,

​           Dolores, Larry, and Cesar,

Formed the U.F.W.,

With the help of many others,

Soon the labor movement grew,

​            As people began to realize,

With the food upon their table,

There were countless workers,

Hidden behind each label,

​            Imagine the day when all children walk,

Without holes in their shoes,

Imagine the day the workers sing,

When songs of joy resolve the Blues,                        

           Si se puede, si se puede,

Said Dolores, si se puede,

Long before Obama,

Yes we can!(repeat)

ANGELINA:      It’s kind of like how Scrooge’s power to reverse his discontent is found

                         in his own heart and mind.

HASSAN:          Huh?

MAYA:               Scrooge figures it out on his own.

HASSAN:          OH.

JOSHUA:          Shush, no spoilers.

MAYA:               Everybody knows the story.

PRINCE:           That’s not true.  I’ve never heard of “A Christmas Carol.”

                         I wish we were seeing “A Kwanzaa Carol” instead.

HAMZAH:         What?

PRINCE:           My family doesn’t really celebrate Christmas, we celebrate Kwanzaa.

HAMZAH:         What’s Kwanzaa?

JAELA:             A celebration of African harvest traditions. 

                         It was started about 50 years ago by a professor in Southern California.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song – “Matunda ya Kwanzaa”

Chorus:                

Matunda ya kwanza,

First Fruits in our bowl,

Matunda ya kwanza,

Fresh Food for our soul,

Family and friends,

the parts of a whole.

Matunda ya kwanzaa,

First Fruits in our bowl.

 

Jambon, Haberigani,

Hello, How are you?

In this Kwanzaa season,

A time to renew,

The bonds between people,

All of us who

Have worked to produce

The fruits that we grew.

 

Chorus:                

 

Matunda ya kwanza,

First Fruits in our bowl,

Matunda ya kwanza,

Fresh Food for our soul,

Family and friends,

the parts of a whole.

Matunda ya kwanzaa,

First Fruits in our bowl.

 “Matunda ya kwanza,”

In Swahili they say,

To celebrate the produce.

That is now on our tray,

From it’s African roots

To the San Francisco Bay.

Seven core principles,

One for each day.

Umoja, together we win.

 

Kujichagulia, with ourselves we begin,

 

Ujima, earn and share what we make,

 

Ujamaa, do our part in the give and take,

 

Nia, value your identity,

                                                              

Kuumba, create more beauty,

 

Imani, have faith in humanity.            

 

Chorus:                

 

Matunda ya kwanza,

First Fruits in our bowl,

Matunda ya kwanza,

Fresh Food for our soul,

Family and friends,

the parts of a whole.

Matunda ya kwanzaa,

First Fruits in our bowl.

 

 

AFREEN:             Arent's those principles part of many traditions?

JAELA:                Seems all of us on this planet could benefit from those principles.

 

MAYA:                  Seems Charles Dickens may have been trying to get

                             at some of the same principles.

ARMANDO:         Speaking of which, we've come to the end of our pre-show

                            and it's time for "A Christmas Carol."

THALIA:               Buckle up for your trip to London.  On second thought, planes pollute.

                             Theater transport is far better for the environment.

ARMANDO:         Thank you ACT for inviting us back. 

MALIK:                 Thanks to the people of San Francisco for funding Arts Education.

ASHLEY:               Of course, thanks to our parents, teachers, and friends,

                              who helped prepare us for this performance.

BERNICE:             Last, but not least, thank you, the audience for listening!

            

REPRISE – At ACT

Sit back and relate to the stories we create!

Thank you for coming to ACT!